can dogs eat acorns

We love our dogs so much that you believe in giving them whatever we consume. Most of the time, we do not even bother to consider that the digestive tract of a dog is a lot more sensitive than humans. Caution is always necessary when it comes to feeding your dog. They cannot consume anything because their digestive system is too fragile to tolerate harmful ingredients. When it comes to the Question, Can Dogs Eat Acorns?

To answer in a single word, NO! Dogs cannot eat acorns no matter how much they want to. Acorns are the nuts of the oak tree, and you will witness a lot of them on the ground, especially during autumn and winter seasons.

Dogs cannot eat acorns because it contains tannins that are extremely toxic for your dog. Dogs can become terminally ill because of these nuts that are, although quite bitter; still, your dog will be tempted to munch on them if it finds it around somewhere. So, keep your dog away from this food at all costs; otherwise, your dog will have a very harsh consequence.

When you are out with your four-legged friend especially for the training of your pup, you must not allow him to pick the acorns from the ground.

What Makes Acorns so Toxic for Dogs?

In most cases, nuts have often proven to be highly contagious for dogs. Although humans love to eat nuts and enjoy them, especially during the winters, they cannot feed them to their dogs. It is because of the certain compounds that are present in them. These compounds create a lot of hindrance in the proper functioning of your dog’s digestive and other internal systems, and that is why the best way to keep your dog safe is by drawing a thick wall between these nuts and your pet.

  • Gallic Acid and Tannins: You might be wondering how this natural treat that is loved and cherished by squirrels can be so harmful to dogs? The answer to it is quite simple, and that is the presence of gallotanins in them. Gallotanins are the combination of gallic acid and tannic, and this combination is deadly for your little pet. Tannins, when ingested by the dogs, cause chaos in its stomach, which further leads to some severe stomach issues. Not only this, but tannins present in the acorn can also become the primary reason for acute kidney failure in your pet.
  • Internal obstruction: Dogs have a greedy nature when it comes to food. They lose their patience and rush towards the food whenever they get the chance. When it comes to acorns, they are quite sharp and hard in texture. They are not at all easy to chew, and your dog might swallow it without chewing it properly. This can lead to internal obstruction that is not good news.

What Harm Can Acorns Bring to Your Dog?

You must be very familiar with food allergies, as most people have gone through such incidents at least once in their lives. The thing about dogs is that they are very vulnerable to food allergies. The food that might be beneficial to a man may not be good at all for your pet. This is the case with the acorns. There are a number of problems that acorns can give rise to if ingested by your furry friend.

  • Vomiting: Vomiting is the first sign that your dog might show up after swallowing these nuts. Precisely, because your dog’s stomach will not accept something toxic for it. The best thing that it can do is to reject it. Also, gallotannin has the tendency to make your dog throw up, which is not a good sign.
  • Diarrhea: Another problem that acorns can cause is severe diarrhea. When your dog intakes something that upsets your stomach, it will disturb the proper working of its metabolic system. Because of this, the stomach will get confused, and your dog will suffer from loose motions and continuous vomiting, as a result.
  • Kidney failure: As dogs are quite sensitive, they quickly become the victims of diseases that are not curable. When dogs ingest toxins that are prohibited, their internal organs begin to collapse as a result. As acorns contain tannins which is extremely dangerous for your pet, it can lead to kidney damage in severe cases.
  • Liver damage: A combination of gallic acid and tannins present in acorns can lead to liver damage in dogs. When ingested in large amounts, your dog’s liver will not be able to handle it as gallotannins directly affect it in an adverse manner.
  • Quercus poisoning: Anything that is associated with acorns is disastrous for your dog. It does not matter whether it is the oak leaves, mature acorns, or the raw acorns; all of them will lead to Quercus poisoning if your dog ingests them in abundance. In other words, acorns poisoning in dogs is knowns as Quercus poisoning.

Acorns are not worth the risk for your pet as the cause nothing but trouble.

What to Do if Your Dog has Accidentally Ingested Acorns?

Acorns can become life-threatening when they are a part of your dog’s regular diet or when your dog consumes them on a regular basis without your knowledge.  In these cases, your dog can even die from kidney or liver failure. But if your dog has accidentally consumed some acorns for the very first time then it is not a serious threat.

Your dog is more likely to suffer from abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea because of it and it will surely get well within the first 24 hours.

All you have to do is to feed him loads and loads of water in order to keep it hydrated. Because of vomiting diarrhea, it might feel lethargic and dehydrated. Here, the only solution is to keep it company and give it water. However, if your dog has ingested a huge amount of acorns in a single go, then do not wait for the symptoms and immediately take it to the vet.

Final Words

Nuts are not your dog’s best friends. They are the enemies that are always ready to attack them. As acorns belong to the nut family, that is why the only solution to keep your dog from being sick is to maintain a distance. Do not let your dogs wander anywhere around the oak trees as they are the major source of acorns.

Also, if you have acorns in the kitchen, then keep them on the highest shelf so your dog will not be able to get a hold of them no matter how much they try. Just do not let your dogs eat acorns!

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